Japan"s first general election, 1890
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Japan"s first general election, 1890 by R. H. P. Mason

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Published by Cambridge U.P. in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Japan. Teikoku Gikai Shūgiin -- Elections.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Bibliography: p. 240-244.

Statement[by] R. H. P. Mason.
SeriesUniversity of Cambridge. Oriental Publications, no. 14, University of Cambridge oriental publications ;, no. 14.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsJQ1692 .M3
The Physical Object
Paginationix, 254 p.
Number of Pages254
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5615627M
ISBN 10052107147X
LC Control Number68023915

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Get this from a library! Japan's first general election, [R H P Mason]. Japan's first general election, Download ( MB) link to publisher version. Statistics; Export Reference to BibTeX; Export Reference to EndNote XML; Altmetric Citations. Mason, R. H. P. Description. This thesis is substantially an account of the general election of , based on reports in the newspapers of that time. By this method Cited by: On July 1, , Japan’s first general election for members of the House of Representatives of the Diet of Japan (第1回衆議院議員総選挙, Dai-ikkai Shugiin Giinsosenkyo) took was the first time in Asia that a national assembly was popularly elected. The general election which took place in Japan in the beginning of this month was the first attempt by an Oriental nation to establish representative government. The Japanese Parliament will open.

National elections. Japan's postwar national legislature, the National Diet (国会, Kokkai), has two directly elected chambers, elected on independent electoral cycles. The House of Representatives (衆議院, Shūgi-in) has members, elected for a rarely completed four-year term, members in single-seat constituencies and members by proportional representation in 11 regional. Japanese general election: In the first general election for the House of Representatives of Japan, about 5% of the adult male population elect a lower house of the Diet of Japan, in accordance with the new Meiji Constitution of July 2 – The Sherman Antitrust Act and Sherman Silver Purchase Act become United States law. Japan - Japan - Government and society: Japan’s constitution was promulgated in and came into force in , superseding the Meiji Constitution of It differs from the earlier document in two fundamental ways: the principle of sovereignty and the stated aim of maintaining Japan as a peaceful and democratic country in perpetuity. The emperor, rather than being the embodiment of all. Japanese general election, In the first general election for the House of Representatives of Japan, about 5% of the adult male population elect a lower house of the Diet of Japan, in accordance with the new Meiji Constitution of July 2 – The Sherman Antitrust Act and Sherman Silver Purchase Act become United States law.

History and background. After the general election for the lower house of the Diet of Japan, the elected members proved much less amenable to government persuasion than had been anticipated by Itō Hirobumi and other members of the Meiji than docilely rubber stamp legislation issued from the House of Peers and the genrō, the leaders of the lower house used the only. The 48th general election of members of the House of Representatives (Japanese: 第48回衆議院議員総選挙, Hepburn: dai-yonjūhachikai Shūgiin giin sōsenkyo) took place on 22 October Voting took place in all Representatives constituencies of Japan – single-member districts and eleven proportional blocks – in order to appoint all members (down from ) of the House. The Government runs under the framework established by the Constitution of Japan, adopted in It is a unitary state, containing forty-seven administrative divisions, with the Emperor as its Head of State. His role is ceremonial and he has no powers related to Government. Instead, it is the Cabinet, comprising the Ministers of State and the Prime Minister, that directs and controls the. Japan Table of Contents. The Japanese political system has three types of elections: general elections to the House of Representatives held every four years (unless the lower house is dissolved earlier), elections to the House of Councillors held every three years to choose one-half of its members, and local elections held every four years for offices in prefectures, cities, and villages.